Mary MacKillop Institute for Health Research

Primary Care and Prevention

Current research

MODERN (Management to Optimise Diabetes and mEtabolic Risk reduction via Nurse-led intervention)

This study will develop a regional health care program that aims to reduce the risks of diabetes and cardiovascular disease for people living in Colac and Shepparton. People living in regional areas have higher levels of the risk factors that lead to these diseases, such as high blood pressure, obesity, blood glucose and lipids. Because there is often limited access to health care in regional areas, this program will implement a health and lifestyle intervention program led by nurses.

Click here for more information about this study (MODERN Study Brochure, PDF, 1MB).

Funding: NHMRC Project Grant
Duration: 2014-2017
Investigator team: Chief Investigators: Associate Professor Melinda Carrington (Centre Director, Primary Care and Prevention, MacKillop Institute), Professor Paul Zimmet (Emeritus Professor, Baker IDI Heart and Diabetes Institute), Associate Investigators: Associate Professor John Furler (Principal Research Fellow, The University of Melbourne), Professor Nigel Stocks (Head of the Discipline of General Practice at The University of Adelaide and Deputy Head of the School of Population Health), Professor David Thompson (Centre Director, Hearts and Minds, MacKillop Institute), Professor Simon Stewart (Director, Mary MacKillop Institute for Health Research), Professor Peter Clifton (Professor of Nutrition, University of South Australia) Professor Garry Jennings (Director and Chief Executive Officer of Baker IDI Heart and Diabetes Institute), Associate Professor Neale Cohen (General Manager of Diabetes Services at the Baker IDI Heart and Diabetes Institute), Professor Paul Scuffham (Director, Centre for Applied Health Economics, Griffith University), Professor Adrian Esterman (Chair of Biostatistics, University of South Australia)

Colac MODERN Study Clinic

Shepparton MODERN Study Clinic

GARDIAN (Green Amber Red Delineation of Risk And Need)

The ‘traffic light’ system referred to as the Green, Amber, Red Delineation of rIsk And Need (GARDIAN) is used as an individual assessment of risk and need in order to titrate — or continuously measure — the intensity and frequency of health care intervention. The system has been applied to primary prevention, secondary prevention and a chronic disease management perspective. This project, supported by Associate Professor Carrington’s NHMRC fellowship, will evaluate the effectiveness of GARDIAN. The project will also develop three dedicated tools for use in a clinical setting; these tools build on trials seeking to prevent cardiovascular disease or diabetes and improve longer-term management of patients with chronic disease.

Funding: NHMRC Career Development Fellowship
Duration: 2012-2015
Project team: Associate Professor Melinda Carrington, Dr Joshua Wiley, Professor Simon Stewart

The Central Australian Heart Protection Study: A randomized trial of nurse-led, family based secondary prevention of acute coronary syndromes

Despite the high burden of cardiovascular diseases among Indigenous Australians, and the growing relative disparity in cardiovascular mortality when compared to non-Indigenous populations, few intervention trials have sought to implement and evaluate novel approaches to reducing differential outcomes in this vulnerable group of individuals.

The aim of this study is to test the effectiveness of a nurse-led, family based secondary prevention program in reducing the incidence of major adverse coronary events (MACE) over a two-year period in both Indigenous and non-Indigenous patients discharged from Alice Springs Hospital (ASH) following an Acute Coronary Syndrome (ACS).

Funding: NHMRC Project Grant
Duration: 2010-2015
Investigator team: A Brown, M Carrington, S Eades, Dr Thompson, C Zeitz
Project team: Associate Professor Melinda Carrington, Dr Joshua Wiley, Professor Simon Stewart

Click here for more information.

Royal Flying Doctor Service

The Centre for Primary Care and Prevention partnered with the Royal Flying Doctor Service (RFDS) Victoria to undertake free cardiovascular and diabetes screening services for people living in regional and rural communities who are known to have poorer health outcomes and increased risk factors. The Centre for Primary Care and Prevention designed the screening program and provided training to volunteer medical and nursing students to undertake the health assessments in the field.

The RFDS of Australia is one of the largest and most comprehensive aeromedical organisations in the world. The RFDS Victoria have been working in the primary health care space in rural locations since 2012 to support the Rural Women’s GP Service, Mobile Dental Services, Diabetes Telehealth and Mobile Eye Care.

Funding: Royal Flying Doctor Service
Duration: 2012 – 2015
Investigator team: Associate Professor Melinda Carrington (Centre Director, Primary Care and Prevention, MacKillop Institute), Dr Yih Kai Chan (Research Fellow, MacKillop Institute), Ms Glynis Cacavas (Research Program Manager, MacKillop Institute)

Click here for more information.

WHICH? II trial

Chronic heart failure (CHF) affects more than 300,000 adults per year and is one of the most common and costly components of hospital care in Australia. Following the Which Heart failure Intervention is most Cost-effective and consumer friendly in reducing Hospital care? Trial (WHICH?), this study aims to further inform the cost-effective application of CHF management programs (MPs) to reduce the negative impact on individuals and the wider community.

The WHICH? II Trial will compare two interventions. The first intervention is a standard, post-discharge CHF management program, incorporating a combination of at least one home visit and hospital outpatient clinics for metropolitan-dwelling patients and structured telephone support for patients in remote areas. This will be compared with a more intensive program of management targeting those most at risk of recurrent and costly hospital stays.

Funding: NHMRC Project Grant
Duration: 2013-2016
Investigator team: Professor Simon Stewart (Director, Mary MacKillop Institute for Health Research), Professor David Thompson (Centre Director, Hearts and Minds, MacKillop Institute)Professor John Horowitz (Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Australia), Associate Professor Melinda Carrington (Centre Director, Primary Care and Prevention, MacKillop Institute), Professor Paul Scuffham (Director, Centre for Applied Health Economics, Griffith University), Associate Professor Chiew Wong (Footscray Hospital, Australia), Dr Phillip Newton (St Vincent’s Hospital Sydney, Australia), Associate Professor Amanda Rischbieth (SA Heart Foundation, Australia), Professor Patricia Davidson (St Vincent’s Hospital Sydney, Australia), Professor Henry Krum (Monash University, Australia), Professor Peter Macdonald (St Vincent’s Hospital Sydney, Australia), Professor Thomas Marwick (Menzies Research Institute, Australia), Professor Christopher Reid (Monash University, Epidemiology and Preventative Medicine), Dr Yih Kai Chan (Research Fellow, Mary MacKillop Institute), Dr Jennifer Whitty (Griffith University, Australia)

Click here for more information.

IMPRESS

There are many factors, known as ‘risk factors, that increase an individual’s chances of developing cardiovascular disease (CVD). One of these risk factors is having a close family member who developed this disease at an early age (before 60 years). For people who have this risk, the aim of the IMPRESS Study is to reduce their chances of developing CVD prematurely. The study compares nurse-facilitated clinic management with standard care over 3 years to improve health and well-being. This research is important because it is well known that many individuals with a family history of premature CVD increase the number of new cases that occur each year. However, many risk factors can be controlled and we are attempting to understand the best way to manage them earlier to reduce the number of new cases of this potentially deadly disease.

Funding: NHMRC Program Grant
Duration: 2009-2015
Project team: Professor Tom Marwick, Professor Simon Stewart, Dr Brian Haluska, Associate Professor Melinda Carrington

NHMRC Centre for Research Excellence (CRE) to Reduce Inequality in Heart Disease

Discover the work of the NHMRC Centre for Research Excellence (CRE) to Reduce Inequality in Heart Disease

The Data Management Unit

The Data Management Unit provides high quality, independent data management services that comply with the world’s best industry standards (International Conference on Harmonisation guidelines for Good Clinical Practice). The Unit works with researchers and university departments to provide data support, ensuring accurate and reliable information. Providing Clinical Data Management services, the Unit accommodates a wide variety of studies. These include data management for academic databases, large registries/repository data and single- and multi-centred Phase I-IV clinical trials for the pharmaceutical industry.

The Unit uses the ClinPlus clinical data management system licensed from DZS Software Solutions. This comprehensive SAS®-based system complies with the Code of Federal Regulations (CF) code 21, part 11. It allows a flexible approach, enabling tailored solutions for all study design needs, including paper-based, electronic data capture (EDC) or a combination of the two within the same study. The system also provides a full internal audit trail.

The Data Management Unit’s staff members have more than 20 years of experience in clinical research organisations and academic institutes.

Click here for more information (Data Management Unit Flyer, PDF, 1MB).

Data Management Unit
Mary MacKillop Institute for Health Research
Australian Catholic University

Level 5, 215 Spring St, Melbourne, VIC 3000

T: 1800 850 622 F: +61 3 9663 5726
E: mackillopinstitute.dmu@acu.edu.au