Mary MacKillop Institute for Health Research

Dr Nolan Hoffman

Dr Nolan Hoffman
BSc PhD

Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Centre for Exercise and Nutrition


Dr Nolan Hoffman’s research is focused on the regulation of whole body and skeletal muscle metabolism by diet and exercise. His research is aimed at mapping and interrogating metabolic signal transduction networks in skeletal muscle, with a specific focus on the energy sensing AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signalling pathway. Nolan’s translational research involves a range of approaches including molecular biology, cell biology, proteomics and physiology.

Nolan completed his BSc in Biology at Butler University in his hometown of Indianapolis, Indiana in the USA. He spent a semester in Australia during his undergraduate studies as an exchange student at the University of Tasmania. Nolan earned his PhD in Cellular and Integrative Physiology in 2012 from Indiana University School of Medicine, where he was named the Chancellor’s Scholar for the Graduate School Doctoral Program. He also received postgraduate training in the business of life sciences and continues to apply this training in research collaborations with pharmaceutical industry partners. Nolan returned to Australia in 2012 to undertake his postdoctoral research at the Garvan Institute of Medical Research and the University of Sydney Charles Perkins Centre. He was awarded the Australian Physiological Society’s Postdoctoral Research Publication Prize in 2015 for research that uncovered the world’s first blueprint of the human skeletal muscle exercise signalling network and several novel AMPK substrates. He has been an invited speaker at several local, national and international seminar series and scientific meetings.

Nolan joined Australian Catholic University as a Postdoctoral Research Fellow in 2016. Overall, the goal of Nolan’s research at the Mary MacKillop Institute for Health Research is to understand how dietary and exercise intervention impacts skeletal muscle metabolic signalling in health and disease to help unleash the therapeutic potential of exercise.

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